Third Rail Eps 19: Lemme Hear You Say… Fight the Power

April 3rd, 2015  |  by Veralyn Williams |  Published in Podcast

On “Lemme Hear You Say… Fight the Power” we break down movement messaging and ask what strategies are being used today. We want to know: Is hip hop still relevant as an organizing tool? And what is the difference between marketing and community outreach?

Guest


Autumn Marie,Communication activist and community organizer, Malcolm X Grassroots Movement & Ferguson Action

Segments


Fight_the_power_graffitiIs hip hop still relevant as an organizing tool?:
Hip Hop, arguably, grew out of a dissatisfaction in Black and Brown neighborhoods with structural oppression. As a result, hip hop has provided the soundtrack to a lot of social justice movements over the past 40 years. The music has been bought, sold and appropriated so much that we are wondering whether or not hip hop still has a place in the movement today and moving forward.

2. What’s the difference between marketing and community outreach?: Doing community outreach often means telling people about what we do and getting them on board. If that sounds a little like business marketing, this conversation is just for you. While marketing skills are transferable, we’re trying to parse out what, if anything, distinguishes the way organizers do grassroots outreach from the way cooperate America does ad campaigns.

3. “Tell em why you mad”

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