About

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Veralyn Williams is an award-winning Journalist who has been tackling questions on identity, social norms, and community since she picked up her first microphone 10 years ago. She currently works to build power in Central Brooklyn as Communications Organizer at the Brooklyn Movement Center (BMC), a membership-led, direct-action, community organizing group. Before joining BMC, Veralyn spent 6 years as a Multimedia Freelance Journalist, producing and reporting stories for WNYC’s Radio Rookies. Her work has also been featured on NPR, Bedsider.org, WBAI, BronxNet Television, and on her personal blog, VeralynMedia.com. Veralyn is a Board Member and Co-Founder of Telem Center for the African Child, a nonprofit providing cultural, educational and recreational programs for children of African descent to explore and celebrate their heritage. Through all of her endeavors she aims to give a voice to perspectives that are often forgotten in the media.

 

About Veralyn Media

I started Veralyn Media in 2010 out of a desire to tell the stories of others. I am one of those people that when asking, “How are you?,” I genuinely want to know the answer. I believe we all are an authority on our stories. And so, Veralyn Media is a multimedia website that is, All About Perspectives.

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  • Remember #BringBackOurGirls? This Is What Happened In The 5 Months Since

    As I mentally prepare to watch and discuss ‪#‎GirlsRising‬ today– a film that portrays the lives of nine young girls from around the world describing the challenges they face being denied an education– I googled “chibok kidnapping nigeria." 

  • photo from Tumblr

    janetmock:

    My new essay explores how Beyonce’s feminist stance in pop culture helped frame my own feminist awakening:

    “I am in my 30s and was emboldened by Beyonce’s feminist stance on that stage, and can’t help but believe that that image will be equally as powerful to young people who witness that moment, whose first engagement with feminism will be that moment. Maybe, just maybe, Beyonce will serve as the bridgebetween pop culture and feminists like bell and Barbara and Audre, maybe some young woman bobbing her head to ‘Blow’ or ‘Partition’ or ‘Flawless’ will do so while reading Ain’t I A Woman? or Homegirls or Sister Outsider.”

    —FROM my new essay: My Feminist Awakening & the Influence of Beyonce’s Pop Culture Declaration